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2016: odd and ends.

tethered 2

2016 was an odd year. Difficult personally, but very fruitful creatively. Maybe one fueled the other? Without taking on the challenge of producing a picture book, or any other large scale project, I was able to have the most productive year of my life. I created a lot of illustrations, started a blog and will have my first art exhibit in April, at the Watertown Free Public Library. I'm excited about the exhibit and what 2017 might hold. Thanks for reading!

I have started making prints for the exhibit.

I have started making prints for the exhibit.

Rose and IV. A sketch I hope to revisit in the new year.

Rose and IV. A sketch I hope to revisit in the new year.

Source: blog post: 2016-odd and ends.

the little prince.

My Little Prince figure.

My Little Prince figure.

The Little Prince (1943) by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry has always been a favorite book of mine. Even before I even read it (I can't remember if this was due to being too young, or too lazy), the illustrations really captured my imagination.

I just had the pleasure of watching the new animated film, based on the book, on Netflix. It's a beautiful film. And while I didn't enjoy the third act, which is new material, its a faithful, adaptation, that honors the spirit of the book.

A still from the new animated film.

A still from the new animated film.

One of the themes of The Little Prince is, it is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye. While I agree with this sentiment, the film version proves that there are some things worth seeing with both your heart and your eyes.

seeing things.

For as long as I can remember, I have always seen characters in the abstract patterns of a carpet, tile, or wall paper. I know that my brother does this too, so its not unique to me.

What I have never done, is to turn what I see into a drawing, until now. Recently, staring at a tiled floor, I saw a cute character and decided to take a photo and try bringing it to life.

The tiled floor.

The tiled floor.

The furry friend who emerged.

The furry friend who emerged.

legacy.

Portrait by Nick Censullo.

Portrait by Nick Censullo.

Unfinished illustration of Nick Censullo I did in 1990. He passed away before I could complete it.

Unfinished illustration of Nick Censullo I did in 1990. He passed away before I could complete it.

My Uncle Nick was big influence on me when I was growing up. He was a talented artist and I remember his paintings hanging on the walls of our home. Uncle Nick was very supportive of my artistic efforts and his encouragement included giving me art supplies as Christmas and birthday gifts. I remember how whenever he would say good-bye, his parting words were always, “keep drawing.” I think he appreciated that part of his legacy would be his influence on me and my art. What better legacy could an uncle have?

Fashion illustration by Nick Censullo.

Fashion illustration by Nick Censullo.

This fall, my niece Amber begins college to study fashion design and photography. She is very talented and I can't wait to see how she grows as an artist.

Keep drawing Amber!

favorite picture book.

Where the Wild Things Are book spread.

Where the Wild Things Are book spread.

Where the Wild Things Are, by Maurice Sendak (1963), has always been my favorite picture book. I say this realizing that it is a bit of a cliché. But it is the first book I can remember that I truly loved and would re-visit throughout my life. In kindergarten, we were allowed at some point during the day to pick a book from the small, one bookcase library, to sit and read. Every day I chose the same one, unless someone beat me to it. But I don't recall that happening at all.

The illustrations are so beautiful and while I didn't I related to Max being punished, I don't recall that happening much either. I did and still do relate to the imagination he displays. It can take you from somewhere mundane, to someplace wild.

Max by Chris Censullo.

Max by Chris Censullo.

Max and Wild Thing by Chris Censullo.

Max and Wild Thing by Chris Censullo.